So what did happen to Carly?

So what did happen to Carly?  (Read the blog posted on January 16th to meet Carly) As a young child, watching TV was a frequent activity requiring little of Carly, yet exhausting her with constant, mind numbing stimulation. During her elementary years, she passively went through the motions of school, content to just get by.  She was good natured and well liked.  She learned how to avoid conflicts by having lots of acquaintances yet keeping a safe “distance” from everyone.  As a veiled perfectionist, Carly had already decided that it was safer not to try than to risk failure – even in relationships. As a teen, media entertainment continued to hold a high attraction for Carly, because it allowed her to pretend, and at the same time numbed the growing disappointment she felt about herself.   When easy going, underachieving Carly turned 16, with an iPod in her ear and a cell phone in hand, she rapidly joined the statistical average, spending nearly 6.5 hours a day multitasking with her electronic media.  It filled up her days, enthralling her, and enabling her to ignore the growing void within.   Surrounded by peers much of the day, with immediate access to friend via her cell phone the rest of the time, she kept herself busy and connected; nonetheless still lonely. Carly entered college, with the mistaken idea that life should be easy, comfortable and entertaining.  Instead she found her path to be challenging- even hard. Anxiety mounted (while her self-worth diminished) when she felt inadequate to walk down the path before her.  The roadblocks and challenges themselves were not the issue, rather...

What happened to Carly?

Sitting on the edge of her dorm room bed, Carly pondered her next steps.  She yearned for a “restart” button that would send her back to the very first day of class, when she had started out with high aspirations. With only two weeks left, not only was her first year of college almost over but her ambitions to become a nurse were also finished.  Unless she found a school that would accept her dismal transcript, she was likely done with college all together. How had it all gone so wrong in just her first year?   Her heart pounded rapidly as anxiety once again threatened to choke her heart.  And how could she tell her parents about the letter from the registrar?  Her influential father had paved the way for her, convincing the admissions officer that Carly’s high school transcript really did not reflect the student she would be in college. Carly has promised her parents that she would rise up and work hard, that paying for her college tuition would not be a waste. She crumpled up the letter, and threw it across the room at the pile of dirty clothes littering the floor. Not invited back! How fair was that? Didn’t they understand that she, as a freshman, needed time to adjust – time to get used to the expectations and pressure of college? No one seemed to care enough to hold her accountable. Sure, she got morning wake up calls from her mom, but after a brief exchange of words, she habitually rolled over and went back to sleep, too exhausted from the night before. Besides,...