Mini Blog #8: Helping Kids Find Their Identity in Christ

Resource: Free to Parent Chapter One and Free to Parent Workbook Chapter One   Some of my grandchildren love to imagine they are superheroes. It’s entertaining to watch them “fly” around in their superman clothing, using their “super powers” to defend and (yes) even attack each other. To fantasize being super human is such fun play for them. It’s certainly entertaining to watch children play imaginary games, which are actually beneficial to their development. It’s quite another thing, however, to be deceived into thinking we can make ourselves into supermoms and superdads raising future supermen and superwomen.The truth is, apart from Christ we will never feel complete or wholly sufficient. The truth is, apart from Christ we will never feel complete or wholly sufficient. In fact, the way to wholeness is found in realizing our very brokenness. It’s when we admit our shortcomings, embrace God’s grace, and allow His power to be made perfect in our weakness (2 Corinthians 12: 8),  that we will actually find our strength. Christ frees me and completes me when I let go of ME and choose HIM instead. It’s the same with our kids. Be watchful for false deceptions – ones that tell them they can be anything, do anything, and have anything they want simply by trying hard enough on their own. These deceptions make it very difficult for kids to admit their mistakes or face their failures, or recognize their deep need for grace. Doing so is admitting they fall short, that they are not enough on their own. In our parenting, we must always gently and wisely be leading our children to...

Deception Waits for Twilight When No Eye Can See

Woe to those who call evil good, and good evil; who put darkness for light, and light for darkness; who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter! Isaiah 5: 20 The eye of the adulterer waits for the twilight, saying, “no eye will see me.” Job 24:15 I had just finished speaking to a group of college women, when Lindsey approached me with tears in her eyes. Grabbing my arms, she emphatically stated, “Warn your families about the dark dangers of Twilight!” She had just come off of an addiction to the Twilight saga, reading them even as she drove her car, and through many sleepless nights. For a year, the series had consumed her thoughts, her imaginations and her energy. The Twilight series had become a dangerous force in Lindsey’s life, not because she wanted to become a vampire, but because through the powerful medium of storytelling, dangerous ideals and messages had gone straight to her heart and captivated her. Twilight is about a spiritually dysfunctional romance between a teenage girl, Bella, and a handsome 108 year old, but frozen at 17 “vampire”, named Edward. What exactly is a vampire and can we honestly consider it fine to imagine a relationship with one? For centuries, vampires have been part of myths understood to be dark creatures of gruesome  horror, close to the dead and they subsist by feeding on human blood, as enemies of the human race. One secular reviewer described the Twilight series as “a dark romance that seeps into the soul.” Rooted in paganism, some readers rationalize a “Christianish” twist to Twilight. Stephenie Meyers, a...