You Asked Us to Go Lord

Guest Author – Kate Krone Kate Krone has been married for 18 years to her husband Andy who teaches Chemistry and Physics at Veritas Academy.  They are blessed with four daughters:  Annalie age 12 (7th grader at Veritas), Emmelia age 10 (5th grader at Veritas), Elliana age 7 and Adaline almost 5. Kate and Andy have served as volunteer Young Life leaders as well as church youth group leaders and are passionate about discipling young people to know the Truth. As a family they desire to actively pursue opportunities to glorify Christ and to join Him where He is at work.  They have been to the DR a couple of times to work with Makarios, a faith based, non-profit organization dedicated to educational development in impoverished parts of the world.  (To learn more about this organization, check out their website at http://makariosinternational.org/) Each time He has asked them to go, He has done amazing things to remind them of who He is. Kate’s beautifully written poem, about their time, in the DR is filled with portrayals of our mighty and faithful God who sustained their family through many trials and struggles.   Kate’s poem personifies 2 Peter 1: 3 that “His divine power has given us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of Him who called us….” May her story encourage us to diligently grow in the knowledge of who Jesus is! You Asked Us to Go Lord and because we knew who You were, that was enough! By Kate Krone You asked us to go Lord to serve as college intern coordinators for Makarios....

Expecting Couragous- and not Cowardly- Responses from Your Kids

Author:  my husband Glen Schuknecht. As I spend time with my grandkids (they call me Opa)  I often think back to memories of raising my own three.  Seeing Erin, Troy and Alisa learn how to be courageous was particularly important to me and a couple “Troy” experiences come to mind. I can still see Troy as a skinny five year old, standing at the end of the pool getting ready for his first ever swim race, the 40 yard freestyle. (actual length of this old pool)  It must have seemed like 400 yards from his young perspective however.  He looked like all the other little guys with his tiny little Speedo and huge goggles.  The goggle strap was pulled tightly (to keep the goggles from falling off), distorting his face and forcing his ears to stick straight out.  His skinny little legs were trembling from the cold Oregon air but likely from fear as well. The buzzer sounded and after a slight hesitation Troy jumped into the water.  The racers were off. I was standing on the far edge of the pool with a towel in hand, ready to wrap around him and hug him with.  I was excited (and proud) to see him finish his first ever official race of any kind.  About 4 strokes into the race however, Troy stopped and grabbing the lane line he began to scream, “I’m so scared”.  Like any good dad, I attempted to soothe his fears by shouting out encouraging words. Soon his “I’m so scared” increased in volume however. I envisioned most of the spectators glaring at the evil dad...

Put On Courage

“The desire for safety stands against every great and noble enterprise.”(Roman historian Tacitus) Parenting and educating kids today is vastly different than it was 35 years ago when my husband and I were brand new teachers.  One of the most significant changes we have witnessed has to do with the diminishing value placed on courage and the increasing ignorance as to its importance. Courage back in Bible times was an assumed outcome of faith, one that regarded opposition and difficulty as occasions for victory in Christ. In the ancient Greek world, the word “virtue” or aretê was used to denote manliness, vigor, courage, valor, fortitude.  When Peter applied it to moral excellence in 2 Peter 1:5, he called for Christians to put on the necessary courage in order to maintain the principles of faith and to endure the trials they would likely face. True virtue is clearly not a tame or passive thing, rather an initiating quality demonstrated in deceasing measure in young people today.  Instead the tender virtues are often extolled at the expense of the gritty ones: courage, perseverance, boldness, or strength. Following are the shifts in viewpoint that my husband and I have seen evolve and grow over time: Parents tend to be adverse to risk with regard to raising their kids.  While striving to keep kids safe is a worthy goal, the net has been expanded to include healthy risk that is necessary in growing a courageous mindset. From highchairs to cribs, from car seats to riding toys, we can be grateful for tougher standards that make the world a safer place for children in...

So what did happen to Carly?

So what did happen to Carly?  (Read the blog posted on January 16th to meet Carly) As a young child, watching TV was a frequent activity requiring little of Carly, yet exhausting her with constant, mind numbing stimulation. During her elementary years, she passively went through the motions of school, content to just get by.  She was good natured and well liked.  She learned how to avoid conflicts by having lots of acquaintances yet keeping a safe “distance” from everyone.  As a veiled perfectionist, Carly had already decided that it was safer not to try than to risk failure – even in relationships. As a teen, media entertainment continued to hold a high attraction for Carly, because it allowed her to pretend, and at the same time numbed the growing disappointment she felt about herself.   When easy going, underachieving Carly turned 16, with an iPod in her ear and a cell phone in hand, she rapidly joined the statistical average, spending nearly 6.5 hours a day multitasking with her electronic media.  It filled up her days, enthralling her, and enabling her to ignore the growing void within.   Surrounded by peers much of the day, with immediate access to friend via her cell phone the rest of the time, she kept herself busy and connected; nonetheless still lonely. Carly entered college, with the mistaken idea that life should be easy, comfortable and entertaining.  Instead she found her path to be challenging- even hard. Anxiety mounted (while her self-worth diminished) when she felt inadequate to walk down the path before her.  The roadblocks and challenges themselves were not the issue, rather...